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Hide & Seek Around Napier!

Find eight species hidden around Napier!Website Tile 150dpi

Embark on a quest around Napier's top spots this summer (16 December - 31 January) to find eight invasive species beautifully illustrated by Ned Barraud. 

Join the National Aquarium as we proudly bring you 'Hide and Seek,' a collaboration with author and illustrator Ned Barraud and publishers Potton & Burton. Utilising Ned's captivating illustrations accept the challenge to explore Napier and hunt out what species shouldn’t be here.

Simply find all eight species then enter the species and their correct location in the entry form below.  You'll then go in the draw to win one of three amazing prize packs. 

WIN!

Each prize pack includes a beautiful Ned Barraud jigsaw and book, plus a soft toy and family (two adults and two children) Friends of Aquarium membership for a year!

This competition is now closed. We will be in contact with the winners soon.

Bell Frog / Poraka

Bell Frog / Poraka

The green and golden bell frog is an Australian frog species that has been firmly established in Aotearoa New Zealand since their introduction in the 1860s. They are found in a wide variety of habitats but tend to be closely tied to bodies of water, and compete with native species for habitat and food resources. These frogs have spread through most of the North Island, and isolated populations can also be found in the Wellington region, as well as Southland. As temperatures increase with warming climates, their range may continue further south.

Long Tail Cuckoo / Koekoeā

Long Tail Cuckoo / Koekoeā

The long tailed cuckoo, with its body-length tail and distinctive screeching call is easily noticeable in forested areas. During the summer, they breed in New Zealand, while in winter, they can be found in the Pacific region spanning from Palau to the Pitcairn Islands.

Asian Paddle Crab / Pāpaka

Asian Paddle Crab / Pāpaka

The Asian paddle crab, a swimming crab native to South East Asia, was first discovered in New Zealand in 2000. It’s known for its aggression and competes with native crabs and other species for both habitat and food resources. This invasive species is currently found in the Waitamata and Whangarei harbours, and Waikare Inlet in Northland, and is spread by vessels carrying larvae in ballast water or hull fouling.

Leopard Slug / Putoko

Leopard Slug / Putoko

The leopard slug, a terrestrial mollusc of considerable size, is originally from Europe but has been unintentionally introduced to various countries worldwide, including New Zealand in 1889, due to human actions. This species has been identified as a potential threat to ecosystems, habitats, and native species.

Thrush / Manu-kaihua-rākau

Thrush / Manu-kaihua-rākau

The thrush, originally from Europe, was brought to New Zealand by English settlers between 1867 and 1879, due to their song evoking nostalgia for English life. In just 60 years, thrushes have successfully established themselves in all major island groups of New Zealand, adapting to various habitats, except for undisturbed native forests. Thrushes have a particular preference for snails, including both native land and marine species, and compete for these food resources with native species.

Stoat / Toriura

Stoat / Toriura

Stoats, introduced to New Zealand in 1879 to control rabbits, have become a big threat to our endangered native species. From very early on, stoats have had a devastating effect on New Zealand’s unique birdlife. They can be found in various habitats, including beaches, forests, scrublands, and farm pastures, and are even known to live near human settlements. They are agile climbers and skilled hunters, stoats are active day and night, and can swim long distances to reach islands.

Black Swan / Wāna

Black Swan / Wāna

Approximately 100 black swans were transported from Australia to the South Island in the 1860’s. However, the population grew at a faster rate than anticipated, indicating the possibility of additional birds arriving independently. New Zealand is home to 10 primary population groups of black swans, with an estimated total population of approximately 60,000 birds. During the winter season, a significant number of these swans congregate at Farewell Spit, at the northern tip of the North Island, for moulting.

Deer / Tia

Deer / Tia

Wild populations of deer in New Zealand have been steadily increasing over the past few decades. These deer are descendants of those that were brought into the country and released starting from 1851. Due to the absence of natural predators, deer numbers have been able to grow, leading to significant damage to native forests. When deer feed on forest plants, trees, and seedlings, they change the natural composition of the forest and deprive other animals of vital food and shelter. This can have long-term consequences for forest regeneration.

* Images supplied by Ned Barraud and Potton & Burton

 

Terms & Conditions

  • Entries must be received through the above completed online entry form.
  • Competition runs 16 December 2023 - 31 January 2024.
  • All entries to be received by 11.59pm, 31 January 2024.
  • Each prize pack (3 in total) include 1 x Ned Barraud book, 1 x Ned Barraud Jigsaw, 1 x Soft Toy, 1 x 12 Month Family Friends of Aquarium Membership (2 Adults, 2 Children).
  • Correct entries (all species matching the correct location) will be identified and participants will be put in the random draw to win one of three prize packs. 
  • Winners will be contacted via phone or email before 20 February 2024.
  • Prizes cannot be swapped or changed.

 

 

 

We can't wait to show you our world.

Opening Hours

Daily from 9:00am - 5:00pm
(including public holidays)
last entry 4:30pm

Address

Marine Parade, Napier

+64 6 834 1404

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